Tuesday, September 16, 2014

A Follow up on Eckhart Tolle and Ego

my mom's list of The Four Agreements in the back cover; this copy of A New Earth is hers. I like the noets she took.


Today feels like a day with no sound. Of course, as I type this I can hear my neighbor singing. I guess that's nice. I'm having one of those just put one foot in front of the other days and that makes it seem like all I can focus on is what's before me and not what's going on around. 

What's in front of me now is Eckhart Tolle's book about ego. I'm actually finally reading it!  Although, I'm surprised because he almost lost me at the start with tightly packed sentences with great meaning and short history lessons. I'm used to reading stories lately. I actually couldn't believe I had read six whole pages when I first started and was convinced that the Table of Contents must have been numbered if I was already that far along, but I'm making my way through it: slowly, slowly, and trying to understand each line as much as I can right now. 

Since I mentioned some thoughts about ego here, I thought I'd share some of the notes I took from the book so far, in case anyone is interested. Here they are:

-"The human mind is highly intelligent. Yet its very intelligence is tainted by madness."

-"The greatest achievement of humanity is not its works of art, science or technology, but the recognition of its own dysfunction, its own madness. "

-"You do not become good by trying to be good, but by finding the goodness that is already within you, and allowing that goodness to emerge. But it can only emerge if something fundamental changes in your state of consciousness."

-"Words, no matter whether they are vocalized and made into sounds or remain unspoken as thoughts, can cast an almost hypnotic spell upon you. You easily lose yourself in them, become hypnotized into implicitly believing that when you have attached a word to something, you know what it is. The fact is: You don't know what it is. You have only covered up the mystery with a label. Everything, a bird, a tree, even a simple stone, and certainly a human being, is ultimately unknowable. This is because it has unfathomable depth."

 -"Of course we have to use words and thoughts. They have their own beauty--but do we need to become imprisoned in them?"

-"The greatest miracle is the experiencing of your essential self as prior to any words, thoughts, mental labels, and images."

-"Language consists of five basic sounds produced by vocal cords...Do you believe some combination of such basic sounds could ever explain who you are, or the ultimate purpose of the universe, or even what a tree or stone is in its depth?" 




p.s. don't let that tree in the picture fool you that the temperatures around here are dropping. It was a high of 93ยบ yesterday. I'm more worried that tree is dying of heat stroke, but I think its leaves are changing and falling prematurely because they came back extra early this year due to excessive winter sun.  

8 comments:

  1. Great post. Funny you should mention Eckhart Tolle as I was just going around quoting him yesterday. :) His books are truly enlightening and they open the mind to such amazing ideas. Like you I try to read his books slowly too as want to make sure I'm grasping all that he's saying. By the way, enjoy the warmth of that 93. In Philly we are already in the low 70's which is kind of cool for early September. Though guess it's good football weather. Have a great day!

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    1. That's cool you can quote him. I've been trying, but I mostly butcher his beautiful sentences. Glad to hear you've enjoyed the book too! Low 70s? That's almost sweater weather ;). Enjoy!

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  2. Goodness, lots to think about there. I like your notes, a good list for life. CJ xx

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    1. I think this book may take me a while to get through, but I'm ok with that.

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  3. As a writer, i love the quote about not getting imprisoned by your words!

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    1. It's freeing just thinking about words not having power over you.

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  4. I think sometimes we SHOULD read books that we know are going to be significant slowly. It allows for thoughts to mull and provoke wee little changes that end up being monumental; you are reading something with a singular purpose as you explore multiple other seasons and phases leading to you getting more out of it than if you had binge-read in one period of time without processing and internalizing.

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    1. I agree Julia, and that's a good point. I'm finding I need to occasionally force myself to do things that are harder for me because they are better for me. I guess that might be something most people have to do. Thanks for the insight. I'll keep it in mind while I'm reading.

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